Guidelines for submitting an article to Learn Journal

Guidelines for submitting an article to Learn Journal

  • Word limit 3,000-5,000excluding references
  • Short (300-500 word) author(s) biography
  • Please note that Tables and Figures are printed in black and white (at present)
  • Two anonymised versions of each article (these will go to external reviewers)
  • One copy with author(s) full contact details including email address and mobile phone number (contact details below)
  • Use Harvard referencing style, see latest edition of Cite it Right
  • Be sparing in the use of bullet points
  • Proof read for spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors
  • Check that the final proof read version is submitted
  • An article can only be published in one journal
  • All articles should add to existing knowledge on a subject or indicate a different perspective on a topic
  • Self-reference to avoid self-plagiarism
  • Articles can include topics such as general education, leadership etc but have a special education focus
  • When using acronyms use full title in the first instance with acronym in brackets acronym can be used thereafter, For example, special educational needs (SEN)
  • Final version of article (as a word document) should be emailed to ilsanationalcommittee@gmail.com with Learn Editorial Board in the subject line.

Suggested guidelines for writing a journal article

 

  • Know your audience for example, primary, post primary teachers, student teachers, researchers etc.
  • Think about how the article will add to existing body of knowledge within research and practice
  • What are you writing about?
  • Summary of research/dissertation
  • Writing to accompany a conference presentation
  • Reflection on own practice
  • Report on action research
  • Review of literature
  • Read previous articles written in the journal
  • Avoid cutting and pasting, especially from the internet, and always acknowledge authors that have influenced your thought when writing your article
  • Minimise the risk of plagiarism by keeping track of where your quotes come from, reference as you go
  • Proof read for spelling, grammatical, punctuation and typographical errors
  • It is a good idea to have a ‘critical friend’ to read and check for spelling/typos/ grammatical errors
  • Check the recommended referencing conventions stipulated by the relevant journal
  • Present a balanced argument and avoid bias
  • Ensure writing is clear and academic in style
  • Think about how the article will benefit practising teachers, researchers etc?
  • Think about how the article will add to the existing body of knowledge within academia, research and practice
  • How does it add to existing academic knowledge?

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